Church at Las Golondrinas

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One of the first buildings you come across at Ranchos de las Golondrinas is the church. The church is the north building of a hacienda that has a central plaza with a well in the center and hornos for baking. Note the church has a pitched, tin roof, but the other buildings have flat roofs. The church originally had a flat roof as well, and the tin roof would have been added after 1850 when New Mexico became a US territory which opened up trade and goods to come in from the Eastern US. The ceiling of the church still has the horizontal vigas (timbers) that supported the original flat, dirt roof.

The interior of the church has simple benches for pews, an artisan crafted retablo at the altar, and hand carved Stations of the Cross (the Stations of the Cross are a modern addition, according to a docent).

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34 thoughts on “Church at Las Golondrinas

  1. Hi, Tim.
    This is one of the very few times we have a couple of pics that actually look pretty similar! I guess with hundreds of pics, it is not surprising one or two are somewhat similar. 😉
    We are still talking about what a great day it was!

    • Thanks, Susan. I saw the photo you took that has me doing the first interior photo. You are in the background of that photo, taking a photo. I can see how we would come up with similar photos of the church.

  2. I like the hanging dried peppers – that is such a New Mexico thing 🙂 What a pretty place to visit… really gives you a feel for life at that time in history.

    • Ristras are very New Mexico and as decorative as they are useful. You do get a sense of the past and the history in Las Golondrinas. It’s lots of fun and makes me appreciate modern technology and all the conveniences that go with it.

    • Thanks, Michelle. One project I have in mind, but haven’t done, is to get photos of all the old churches and missions in NM. One problem is some of the coolest churches are on pueblos and the indians get really picky about photographs on their lands.

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