More Cow

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Even more cow at      http://photos.tandlphotos.com/blog/2016/10/more-cow

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Asses & Molasses @ Las Golondrinas

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This is a demonstration of how farmers made molasses from sorghum cane in the 18th Century at las Golondrinas: 1) They prepared the sorghum cain by cutting the seed heads off the ends of the canes. 2) They harnessed their ass to a long pole connected to a big iron crusher. 3) They walked their ass in circles turning the crusher, while a person fed sorghum cane into the crusher to extract the sugary juice from the cane. 4) They cooked the sorghum extract and reduced it to molasses.

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Quarai

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Quarai is about 10 miles straight north of Abó, and about 20 miles from Abó by taking Hwy 60 east to Mountainair, and then Hwy 55 north to Quarai. Quarai was a thriving village when the Spanish arrived at the end of the 16th Century, and was the seat of the New Mexico Inquisition during the 1600’s. Records show that the Inquisitioners in New Mexico at that time were fair and compassionate, and used the sophisticated Spanish legal system to protect the Indian’s civil and property rights.

Like Abó, the church at Quarai was oriented on a north/south axis and there is a Kiva on the east side of the church. Unlike Abó, the Kiva is square. The design of the church at Quarai has a traditional layout, but still had a flat roof. Its ruins look very much like a castle standing on the east side of the church, looking toward the west. The last photo is of a sketch on the site that depicts what the Pueblo would have looked like in the 17th Century.

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Cuarai

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